Review: The Bone Houses

The Bone Houses by Emily Lloyd-Jones

“The dead deserve something,” she said, trying to explain in a way a layman might understand. “A remembrance, a marker, a place to rest. Death should be peaceful—the dead have earned that much. The bone houses—they’re a mockery of death. Burning them . . . it’s a last resort, not a way out.”

If you’re in the market for a beautifully written, atmospheric story to get you in the mood for autumn, look no further: The Bone Houses by Emily Lloyd-Jones is one you won’t want to miss.

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Review: Rules for Vanishing

Rules for Vanishing

“Do you want to know where Lucy went? She went to play the game. You can play, too. Find a partner. Find a key. Find the road. You have two days.”

What would you do if your entire school received the same ominous text message? I’d probably go home and hide in my room until people stopped talking about it, but the characters in Rules for Vanishing aren’t afraid of much, and decide to play this eerie game.

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Review: How to Hack a Heartbreak

How to Hack a Heartbreak by Kristin Rockaway

“Some people think I made JerkAlert as part of a malicious, premeditated scheme to humiliate men at large. But in truth, it was just a gut reaction to the futility of the status quo. I’d had a few really bad days, featuring a few really bad dudes. So I did what any disgruntled coder would do: I created an anonymous website where women could rate their dating experiences with the guys they met on Fluttr. Kind of like Yelp, but instead of reviewing restaurants or nail salons, you reviewed your dates.”

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Review: The Arrangement

The Arrangement by Robyn Harding

“Welcome to the sugar bowl.”

While this might sound like a sweet-tooth’s dream, it’s actually something quite different. In Robyn Harding’s newest domestic thriller, The Arrangement, readers meet Natalie and Gabe, a couple involved in a sugar-baby/sugar-daddy relationship.

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Review: Dear Wife

Dear Wife by Kimberly Belle

“Leaving does not stop the violence, and it doesn’t guarantee freedom. Why doesn’t she just leave? gets asked in living rooms and courtrooms across the country, when a better question would be, Why doesn’t he let her go? It took me a while, but I’ve finally figured out the answer. You’d sooner kill me than let me go.”

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